The Warning

b14eb91097123c0add873869bb2a2fa9

His footsteps as heavy as his heart, he walked up the stairs of the great house, entering their private quarters.

At the sight of her, still seated and staring expressionlessly out the window, he felt the black curtain of depression descend. Her hands held a small daguerreotype. Seeing this, his own grief nearly overcame him.

Willie, my son…

Instead, he knelt down next to her and pointed in the direction of the lunatic asylum. β€œMother, if you cannot control your grief, it will drive you mad, and we may have to send you there.”

Mary Todd Lincoln only nodded.

__________________
Word Count: 100
Author’s Note: This story is based on a true incident in the life of Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln. When their son, William (‘Willie’) Lincoln died in 1862 at the age of eleven, Lincoln despaired for the sanity of his already erratic wife, fearing her grief would unhinge her. The photo above is of Willie.

This piece of micro fiction was written in response to Velvet Verbosity’s 100 Word Challenge to craft a story utilizing the word (or theme of) ‘black.’ The 100 Word Challenge can be found here.

About Kate Loveton

Aspiring novelist. Avid reader of fiction. Reviewer of books. By day, my undercover identity is that of meek, mild-mannered legal assistant, Kate Loveton, working in the confines of a stuffy corporate law office; by night, however, I'm a super hero: Kate Loveton, Aspiring Novelist and Spinner of Tales. My favorite words are 'Once upon a time... ' Won't you join me on my journey as I attempt to turn a hobby into something more?
This entry was posted in My Fiction and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

27 Responses to The Warning

  1. Lucy says:

    Poor Mother. Poor Mary. Poor Mother Mary. Nicely done. Lucy

  2. That poor woman. How can you not go mad when you lose a child?

    • Kate Loveton says:

      I can’t imagine. She went through this with two other sons, as well… and, of course, witnessed her husband’s murder right before her eyes. Added to her problems was being married to a man prosecuting a war against the South when so many of her family members considered themselves Southerners.

      Terrible, terrible life…

  3. stacilys says:

    Oh wow, what a story. You depicted it so well Kate.
    πŸ™‚

  4. So much in so less a words ,,,

  5. This flash is laden with emotion for such a short piece. ❀ ❀ ❀ I was engaged from the first sentence. Awesome.
    "His footsteps as heavy as his heart…"
    "..black curtain of depression…:

    • Kate Loveton says:

      Hi Tess, I’m glad the first sentence drew you in. I had such a picture in my mind of Lincoln’s figure ascending the stairs, dressed in a black suit, each step heavy with grief and trouble. When his son died, Lincoln had to carry on with the prosecution of the war, deal with his troubled wife and also not let his own grief overwhelm him. An amazing man.

  6. Excellent stuff as always Kate, you continue to overwhelm me with your awesomeness! πŸ™‚

  7. At the sight of her, still seated and staring expressionlessly out the window, he felt the black curtain of depression descend. Her hands held a small daguerreotype. Seeing this, his own grief nearly overcame him.

    Seriously…this is my favorite, maybe because I’ve been in a similar spot.
    I enjoyed this, Kate. Thank you.

  8. Kate, the impact is powerful and authentic – this is very fine writing indeed.

  9. Great choice for your 100 words, but then you are clever, inventive and a wonderful writer. Your devoted fan,

  10. willow1945 says:

    A tragic moment in that family, even desperate, and very well rendered by you. Excellent!

    • Kate Loveton says:

      Thanks, Willow! I’ve always felt sorry for Mary Lincoln. Some modern day historians now speculate she may have been bipolar. No drugs back then to address the illness. Her story is a tragic one, filled with horror, loneliness and heartbreak.

  11. Nice. I wished you had 200 words….

  12. sknicholls says:

    Aww…this was so very emotional and real. You did good with few words to set a stage.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s